Have you ever wondered which houses are essential that you must see them in your visit to Barcelona? We bring you a selection of modernist houses in Barcelona that you must add to your essential checklist.

Casa Batlló

Located at number 43 Passeig de Gràcia, Casa Batlló does not leave the walker indifferent. Its lively colors and meticulous decoration invite you to visit it. This house is one of the works of the naturist period of Antoni Gaudí and one of his best-known works.

La Pedrera

Built between 1906 and 1912, La Pedrera is another of the icons of Passeig de Gràcia. It also belongs to the naturalistic period of the famous architect, as we can see from the decorative motifs on its façade. The marine motifs stand out in its colorful decoration.

Casa Vicens

Casa Vicens stands out for being the first house designed by Antoni Gaudí in Barcelona. This house was built between 1883 and 1885 and is considered one of the first works to inaugurate Art Nouveau in Catalonia.

Casa de les Punxes

Casa de les Punxes, revolutionary both artistically and technically, is the great work of Puig i Cadafalch. Located in the heart of Barcelona, between La Pedrera and La Sagrada Familia, it is a key piece for understanding Catalan Art Nouveau. Its monumentality is unparalleled, it contains three houses in a single building with multiple floors.

Casa Felip

The least known and most sober of the five, Casa Felip by the architect Telmo Fernández Janot, was built between 1911 and 1913. Its style is considered modernist with “baroque” flavors. A small jewel as unknown as it is surprising.

Do you know other houses that you think are essential in a visit to Barcelona?


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Do you know the indispensable triad of Catalan Art Nouveau? I’m sure you’ve heard their names. Yes, yes… we are talking about Antoni Gaudí, Domènech i Montaner i Puig i Cadafalch. Who else! We’ll tell you a little about them, in case you don’t know them yet.

Domènech i Montaner (1850-1923)

This great architect was a contemporary of Gaudí and a very active figure in contemporary Catalan politics. His work history includes the famous Recinte Modernista Sant Pau and the well-known Palau de la Música Catalana in Barcelona. Surely you have heard of these buildings and their exuberant beauty. The style of its buildings is characterized by rational structures and highly ornate facades, with every detail in the decoration.


Antoni Gaudí (1852-1926)

Can something new be said about the great architect of nature? Who does not know the Sagrada Familia? or la Pedrera? Casa Batlló? and Casa Vicens? We would never finish, because in addition to being one of the best-known architects, he was very prolific. Yes, we can tell you a couple of curiosities that not everyone knows. For example, Gaudí almost never designed his works in plans, but he did it on three-dimensional models in every detail. Thus, the collaborators could see it as he had projected it in his mind. Another detail that we confess is that the famous technique of the “trencadís” that we can see in his work, was invented by himself and was used for the first time in the construction of the finca Güell.


Puig i Cadafalch (1867-1956)

The young Puig i Cadafalch was one of Domènech i Montaner’s disciples. He is considered one of the last representatives of Catalan Art Nouveau and one of the first of Noucentisme. His work is usually divided into three periods: the Art Nouveau, the rational idealist and the monumentalist. Like his mentor, Puig i Cadafalch was an active agent in the contemporary politics around him. In his Art Nouveau period he produced such well-known works as Casa Amatller, Casa Martí or one of its great culminations: Casa Terradas or Casa de les Punxes, recently opened to the public.

If you want to go beyond the mainstream and the classic Gaudí routes, we bring you our proposal to go deeper into the work of Puig i Cadafalch.

Who does not know the Ruta del Modernisme in Barcelona? Thanks to it, we can discover the great jewels of Catalan Art Nouveau in Barcelona in an orderly and comfortable way. If you want to go beyond the mainstream and the classic Gaudí routes, we bring you our proposal to go deeper into the work of Puig i Cadafalch.

Our route proposal starts at Casa Macaya, in the heart of Avinguda Diagonal. This house is nowadays a cultural centre and has free access to some of its rooms, so it can be visited comfortably in a walk. If you want to go further, Cases Singulars organizes visits (in Catalan) every Monday in July and August in the morning and afternoon in this space. Nearby is the Casa Terradas or Casa de les Punxes, one of its most impressive and well-known works, which can be visited every day between 10 am and 7 pm (with the last access at 6 pm). Its museum has various types of visits for all tastes and interesting offers for the resident public. In addition, on the ground floor we can find the bar restaurant Matalaranya, a great option for breakfast. After breakfast, a few steps away lies the Palace of the Baron of Quadras, currently an institute. This building can be visited through Cases Singulars on Wednesday mornings. Returning to Diagonal, we find Can Serra, current headquarters of the Diputació de Barcelona and a little further on the Casa Pere Company, now converted into a Museum and Centre for Sports Studies.

Once the works of the Diagonal have been toured, when going down Passeig de Gràcia is when we come across the also very well-known Casa Amatller, which can be visited every day from 11 am to 6 pm. Once in Plaça Catalunya, we can discover the forgotten Casa Pich i Pon, which has hosted various companies and associations throughout its history. Descending from it through Avinguda de Portal de l’Àngel, we find Casa Martí and Casa Carreras: one in front of the other. These two houses have hosted (and one of them still hosts) the famous bar 4 Gats. If you want to eat at it, we recommend booking in advance. Less than 5 minutes walking, in Via Laietana, we can glimpse the main facade of the little-known Casa Guarro.

To finish the route, we must go to Plaça Espanya and enjoy it, as it is also the work of Puig i Cadafalch. In one of its margins we can admire the old Casaramona Factory and the Palaces of Alfonoso XIII and Victoria Eugenia, both part of the Axis of the 1929 Universal Exhibition (as well as the square).

Extra: If you still want to discover Puig i Cadafalch, we recommend that you go and discover his most unknown works from the upper part of the city, such as Casa Sastre i Marquès, Rosa Alemany, Muley-Afid or Casa Muntades. None of these latter houses can be visited, but you can admire their façades.


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Francesc Berenguer was the son of one of Gaudí’s primary school teachers, with whom he would end up studying architecture and working.

Retrat de Francesc Berenguer i Mestres, arquitecte modernista català (1866.1914)

Francesc Berenguer i Mestres is a little-known figure in Catalan Art Nouveau. Although he worked as such, he never obtained the title of architect. This condition prevented him from signing projects, so that many of the works in which he collaborated are not recognised. Today, on the 153rd anniversary of his birth, we bring you his curious and interesting history.

Francesc Berenguer was born in Reus on 21 July 1866 and died 47 years later, on 8 February 1914. Francesc Berenguer was the son of one of Gaudí’s primary school teachers, with whom he would end up studying architecture and working. Berenguer studied architecture between 1882 and 1888 but never graduated, which meant he could not sign the plans he designed. Other Art Nouveau architects were those who claimed his plans, such as Juan Rubió, Pascual and Tintorer or Gaudi himself. From 1887 until his death, Berenguer worked for Gaudí, supporting him in large projects such as the Güell Palace or the Sagrada Familia. Most of his attributions are discussed due to the problems surrounding the authorship of the projects.

His son, Francesc Berenguer i Bellvehí, also studied architecture, obtaining the title in 1914. Berenguer’s son also adopted the Art Nouveau style in his works. He worked with Gaudí, his father and other Art Nouveau architects in and around Barcelona, as did his father, although he was able to sign his own projects.

Art Nouveau architecture hides the names of such curious figures as this one. Do you know everybody who collaborated in the construction and decoration of La Pedrera? Casa Amatller? Casa de les Punxes? Catalan Art Nouveau still hides many secrets in its museums in Barcelona.


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The Art Nouveau style: a radical reaction

Among the characteristics of Art Nouveau, we find both respect for materials and for the artist, who enjoyed absolute freedom during the creative process.

Art Nouveau architecture brings with it sinuous curves and natural elements against serial and soulless production and against the academic art that was imposed in Art Schools. The architects of the end of the 19th century debated between the technological advances generated by the Industrial Revolution, which subordinated the appearance of the building to its structure, and continuing to use traditional, more historical styles. The Art Nouveau architects demanded their own style, new, in keeping with the ambitions and expectations of a rejuvenated and restless society, instead of being confirmed by one of these options.

Art Nouveau draws as much from the advances made in building techniques and materials during the Industrial Revolution as from the revaluation that the Arts & Crafts movement brought to crafts. Among the characteristics of Art Nouveau, we find both respect for materials and for the artist, who enjoyed absolute freedom during the creative process.

This is the only way to explain styles as personalized as those developed by modernist architects such as Puig i Cadafalch (Casa Ametller, Casa de les Punxes), Gaudí (Casa Batlló, Sagrada Família, La Pedrera) or Domènech i Muntaner (Hospital de St. Pau, Palau de la Música).

These famous Catalan artists knew how to combine the best of both tendencies in the local panorama; making Catalan Art Nouveau a consistent movement and making possible, through their constructions in the Catalan capital, an Art Nouveau route in Barcelona like the one that can be done today.

Have you ever been to a museum in Barcelona to discover Catalan Art Nouveau? There are guided tours in Barcelona of Art Nouveau architecture such as the Casa de les Punxes by Puig and Cadafalch or the Pedrera by Antoni Gaudí.


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